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The Empire State Building And 13 Other Related Buildings Will Now Be Powered By Wind Energy

The Empire State Building And 13 Other Related Buildings Will Now Be Powered By Wind Energy

The Empire State Realty Trust signed a three-year contract with Green Mountain Energy to generate an estimated 300 million kilowatt-hours of electricity.

In a huge leap toward a greener world, New York City's iconic Empire State Building and its affiliated properties buildings are now totally running on energy sourced from wind power. The new year is off to a great start for the 15,000 people working inside. This comes after the Empire State Realty Trust, Inc. (ESRT) signed a three-year contract with Green Mountain Energy to power its entire real estate portfolio throughout New York and Connecticut with clean and green renewable wind electricity, reported the Good News Network. The trust owns the 102-story skyscraper as well as 13 other office buildings.

 

 



 

 

This would also be the nation’s biggest real estate user adopting entirely renewable energy. “More and more building owners are understanding the critical role that our skyline plays in tackling climate change and how they can be an important part of the solution,” Donna De Costanzo, a director for climate and clean energy at the Natural Resources Defense Council told The Washington Post. Considering how some of the largest emission of greenhouse gasses is from maintaining buildings, this comes as a welcome step. In a city like New York, more than two-thirds of the city’s carbon emissions are due to buildings. 

 



 

 

Dana Robbins Schneider, SVP, director of energy, sustainability & ESG at Empire State Realty Trust stated, “ESRT is the leader in sustainable operations with a viable example of how to scale carbon-neutral technologies, strategies, and policies to balance with an effective economic business case.” In fact, this switch to wind energy will spare about 450 million pounds of carbon dioxide emissions from entering the atmosphere, reported The Hill. The contract has already come into effect as of January 1 and will be providing an estimated 300 million kilowatt-hours of electricity for ESRT owned properties. That is enough energy to light every home in New York state for a month.

 



 

 

Schneider also added, “We have purchased renewable power from Green Mountain Energy for the World's Most Famous Building, the Empire State Building, for a decade. We now expand that to all properties in New York State with an additional Direct Energy contract for our Connecticut properties. We continue to advance our commitment to solutions that reduce our environmental impact. Our tenants now work in carbon neutral offices and the investment community can recognize our leadership.” The ESRT has set precedent for sustainability considering how the skyscraper itself has run on renewable energy since 2011.

 



 

 

"At Green Mountain, we're encouraged by the sustained and vocal advocacy from Empire State Realty Trust that continues to lead New York's transition to renewable energy," Mark Parsons, vice president and general manager of Green Mountain Energy said in a statement. "As the longest-serving competitive green energy provider, our mission is to use the power of consumer choice to change the way power is made, and we are committed to helping New Yorkers reduce their carbon footprint." This deal is also working out well for ESRT which is expected to save an estimated $800,000 in just the first year of the contract.

 



 

 

Anthony Malkin, the trust’s chief executive said that this decision was "as much a business decision as an environmental one." Even the tenants occupying the ESRT property have switched over to green energy. “It’s so important to have examples like ESRT to show the nation that renewable power options are affordable and, dare I say, competitive,” Cyndy Reynolds, commercial sales director for Green Mountain Energy said. Malkin observed, “If we increase the demand for clean power, we will necessarily decrease the demand for polluting power. And if we decrease the demand for polluting power, that stuff will come off the grid.”

 



 

 


 
  
 

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