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This Is What The Human Face Might Look Like 100,000 Years From Now

This Is What The Human Face Might Look Like 100,000 Years From Now

Dr. Alan Kwan, along with artist and researcher Nickolay Lamm, has created a series of images of what humans may look like in the future and they are eye-opening

Human beings as a species evolved from the primitive apes to who we are now. The process took thousands of years but we now have a brain that is thrice the size of what our ancestors had. We are at the peak of technological development and it may feel like we have attained our most perfect form yet. But that's not true at all. We are still developing and evolving. The evolution process is not something that comes to a stop. That can only mean that after several hundred years into the future, we may have taken on an even more advanced form. 

 



 

 

Dr. Alan Kwan, a Ph.D. in Computational Genomics from Washington University has hypothesized what we may look like in the future. Writing for My Voucher Codes, Kwan stated, "While the future remains unknowable (for now), Nickolay Lamm produced one set of possible changes to the human face in one possible timeline where, 100,000 years in the future, through zygotic genome engineering technology, our future selves control human biology and human evolution the way we control electrons today." Based on what Kwan envisioned, artist and researcher Lamm created some eye-popping projections of what humans may look like in the future.

 

"In this future, humankind has wrested control of the human form from natural evolution and are able to bend human biology to human needs," Kwan said. The pictures of a man and woman are shown through the years and there is a noticeable increase in the size of the forehead and eyes. Kwan states that this is because "the human head will trend larger to accommodate a larger brain." 

This is what we look like now:

 

Source: Nickolay Lamm

 

This is what humans may look like in 20,000 years:

 

Source: Nickolay Lamm

 

 

Kwan explained, "Instead of some orthogonal evolutionary path that ends up with the 210th-century human a la Futurama’s Morbo the anchor-alien, the rule of viable human biology will still apply and so the entire head will trend larger, though with a bias for a greater cranium growth than facial growth; the human 20,000 years from now would look to us like someone today except we would notice the forehead is subtly too large."

 

He also believes that communication lenses would have replaced devices such as Google Glass. This would make our eyes bigger to accommodate the lens. In 60,000 years, we would have a bigger head, eyes, and would also have more pigmented skin. "While evolution in space is only beginning to be explored today, we would hazard a guess that millennia of human space colonization of Earth-orbit and other solar system space colonies will also select for," Kwan stated. This is what we would look like after 60,000 years.

 

Source: Nickolay Lamm

 

Since we may have moved farther from the Sun, Kwan states that humans would evolve to develop larger eyes in response to the dimmer environment of the faraway colonies. The skin would get more pigmented to alleviate the damaging impact of the increased harmful UV radiation outside of the Earth’s protective ozone. Humans would also have thicker eyelids or a more pronounced superciliary arch to alleviate the effects of low or no gravity that disrupt and disorient the eyesight of today’s astronauts on the ISS. Kwan is also sure that we would now function with nanochips embedded into us. This is what we would look like 100,000 years from now according to Kwan:

 

Source: Nickolay Lamm

 

We take on a look like how we believe aliens look currently. According to Kwan, "This human face will be heavily biased towards features that humans find fundamentally appealing: strong, regal lines, straight nose, intense eyes, and placement of facial features that adhere to the golden ratio and left/right perfect symmetry. Functional bias will be incorporated into the vanity driven constraints above. Eyes would seem unnervingly large to us and have “eye shine” from the tapetum lucidum. Sideways blink of the reintroduced plica semilunaris to further protect from cosmic ray effects would be particularly startling." This is, of course, a "what if" situation, and the artist, as well as the researcher, encourage people to hypothesize their own versions of humans in the future.

 



 

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